Posted in Black History

Today In Black History: Debi Thomas Becomes The 1st African American To Win A Winter Olympic Medal

Debi Thomas became the first African-American athlete to earn a medal in the Winter Olympics when she took the bronze in women’s figure skating in 1988.

Thomas was born in Poughkeepsie, New York, and started skating at age 5 winning her first competition at age 9. She led all skaters heading into the long program at the 1988 Olympics in Calgary and finished third winning a bronze medal. She was inducted into the U.S. Figure Skating Hall of Fame in 2000. (Source: The Undefeated)

The Skating Champion and former orthopedic surgeon declared bankruptcy in 2014. Thomas has publicly spoke out about losing everything to bankrupt, being bipolar, losing her surgical practice, and living in a trailer home.  Thomas told the New York Post, that she even lost her Olympic Bronze Medal in the bankruptcy saying, “They can take away the medal, but they can’t take away the fact that I won it.” (Source: face2faceafrica.com)

Last year, Thomas was spotted on Youtube in Egypt endorsing “BlockCard” which converts cryptocurrency into a Visa debit card. Praying that life is on the upswing for this talented athlete and doctor.

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Posted in Black History

Today In Black History: Camp Atwater – The Oldest African American Owned & Operated Camp In The Nation

Camp Atwater is a residential summer camp for boys and girls, 8 – 15 years old located in North Brookfield, MA. Serving youth for 92 years, Camp Atwater’s mission is to assist in the academic and social growth and development of youth by offering a quality residential camp experience within a safe, nurturing and Afrocentric environment.

Camp Atwater is owned and operated by the Urban League of Springfield and accredited by the American Camping Association. Founded in 1921 by the late Dr. William N. DeBerry, it was named in honor of Dr. David Fisher Atwater, whose daughter Mary donated substantially to the camp. Camp Atwater is one of the oldest camps of its kind in the country and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. (Source: Urban League of Springfield, MA)

Camp Atwater/Public Domain

Find out more about the camp that even Former Detroit’s Mayor Coleman Young enjoyed here:  campatwater.org

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Posted in Black History

Today In Black History: Celebrating the life of Katherine Johnson, NASA Mathematician

The Washington Post reports that Katherine Johnson, the NASA mathematician who was depicted in “Hidden Figures,” died Monday (Feb. 24). She was 101.

Katherine Johnson NASA/Created: 31 December 1965/Public Domain

Johnson began working at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1953, and she was classified as “subprofessional,” and likened to the ranking of a janitor.

But her job didn’t involve cleaning; Johnson used a slide rule or mechanical calculator in complex calculations to review the work of her superiors — white male engineers. Her title was “computer,” the technology that would eventually make the services of many of her colleagues no longer needed.

 Taraji P. Henson portrayed Johnson in the 2016 Oscar-nominated film Hidden Figures about trailblazing black women whose work at NASA was pivotal during the Space Race. (Source: The Detroit Praise Network)

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Posted in Beauty, Black History

Today In Black History: Remembering B. Smith

Model, restaurant owner and lifestyle guru, B. Smith died Saturday night in her home from Alzheimer’s. She was 70.  In 1976 she became the first black woman featured on the cover of Mademoiselle magazine. She opened 3 restaurants in New York City, Long Island and Washington, DC. Smith also had her own cooking and lifestyle show, B. Smith with Style, which made its debut in 1997.

Often unfairly called the black Martha Stewart, B. Smith was a legend in her own right. Smith embodied glamour affluence, poise, grace and Afrocentrism. B. Smith rocked natural hair before it was popular in the main stream. She was always different but yet the same. She spoke to many black people who thought that’s exactly me.   We drink wine.  We are cultured.  Conversely she showed others a broader or image of the African-American. (More From: Colorstream Media)

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